The distribution of tree and grass roots in savannas in relation to soil nitrogen and water

Author: 
February, E C
Higgins, S I
Publisher: 
South African Journal of Botany
Publication Year: 
2010
Description: 
Here we describe the fine root distribution of trees and grasses relative to soil nitrogen and water profiles. The primary objective is to improve our understanding of edaphic processes influencing the relative abundance of trees and grasses in savanna systems. We do this at both a mesic (737 mm MAP) site on sandy-loam soils and at an arid (547 mm MAP) site on clay rich soils in the Kruger National Park in South Africa. The proportion of tree and grass fine roots at each soil depth were estimated using the ?13C values of fine roots and the ?13C end members of the fine roots of the dominant trees and grasses at our study sites. Changes in soil nitrogen concentrations with depth were indexed using total soil nitrogen concentrations and soil ?15N values. Soil water content was measured at different depths using capacitance probes. We show that most tree and grass roots are located in the upper layers of the soil and that both tree and grass roots are present at the bottom of the profile. We demonstrate that root density is positively related to the distribution of soil nitrogen and negatively related to soil moisture. We attribute the negative correlation with soil moisture to evaporation from the soil surface and uptake by roots. Our data is a snapshot of a dynamic process, here the picture it provides is potentially misleading. To understand whether roots in this system are primarily foraging for water or for nitrogen future studies need to include a dynamic component.
Name of Journal: 
South African Journal of Botany
Volume: 
76
Number: 
3
Pages: 
517-523
Resource Type: 
Text
Document Type: 
Journal Issue/Article
Grassland Society of Southern Africa

The Grassland Society of Southern Africa (GSSA) is involved and concerned with the science and practice of range and pasture management. This broad field involves primarily the use and conservation of natural resources. It encompasses applied fields such as livestock production, wildlife management, nature conservation, water catchment management and range and mine-dump rehabilitation. The disciplines include, amongst others, ecology, botany zoology, range and pasture science, animal science, soil science and genetics. This collection includes journal articles from the African Journal of Range and Forage Science as well as related articles and reports from throughout the Southern African region.