Jaguar Critical Habitat Designation Causes Concern for Southwestern Ranchers

Author: 
Svancara, Colleen M.
Lien, Aaron M.
Vanasco, Wendy T.
Lopez-Hoffman, Laura
Bonar, Scott A.
Ruyle, George B.
Publisher: 
Society for Range Management
Publication Year: 
2015
Description: 
Abstract: The designation of jaguar critical habitat in April 2014 in southern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico created concern for livestock ranchers in the region. We interviewed ranchers to understand their concerns with the jaguar critical habitat designation and their attitudes toward jaguars, wildlife conservation, and resource management in general. Ranchers we interviewed were concerned about direct impacts of designated critical habitat on ranching, as well as possible alternative agendas of critical habitat advocates and issues specific to the borderlands region. The ranchers were less concerned about the presence of jaguars but were more concerned about possible limiting effects of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), distrust of government entities, and litigious environmental groups. To maximize effectiveness, government agencies should work to foster trust in the ranching community, be cognizant of sensitive issues specific to the region that may challenge endangered species conservation goals, recognize the opportunity to work with ranchers for endangered species management, and provide outreach about implications of the ESA.
Name of Journal: 
Rangelands
Volume: 
37
Number: 
4
Pages: 
144 - 151
Resource Type: 
Text
Document Type: 
Journal Issue/Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI):: 
10.1016/j.rala.2015.05.003
Altar Valley Conservation Alliance

The Altar Valley Conservation Alliance is a collaborative conservation organization founded in 1995, and incorporated as a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization.  Just southwest of Tucson, Arizona, the Altar Valley comprises approximately 610,000 acres of Sonoran desert grassland, some of the most biologically rich and ecologically threatened biotic communities in the world. Private ranches work side by side with federal, state and local agencies to manage the valley, which is the largest unfragmented watershed in Pima County, outside of the Tohono O’odham Nation to the west. This collection is an archive of reports and other documents specific to Alliance activities.