A Collaborative Program to Provide Native Plant Materials for the Great Basin

Author: 
Shaw, Nancy
Pellant, Mike
Publisher: 
Society for Range Management
Publication Year: 
2012
Description: 
The Great Basin as de ned on a oristic ba- sis1 includes the hydrographic Great Basin plus the Owyhee Uplands and Snake River Plain of southern Idaho (Fig. 1). The region encom- passes about 60 million ha, of which more than two-thirds are publicly owned. Vegetation ranges from salt desert and sagebrush shrublands in the basins to conifer forests in the more than 200 mountain ranges. Historic land management opened the environment to invasion by exotic annual grasses, primarily cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum). Resulting changes in re regimes and more recent human disturbances such as en- ergy development, mining, and recreation have combined to increase the spread of annual and perennial exotics, deplete native seed banks, simplify community structure and species associations, and reduce landscape patchiness. Ecosystem resilience declines with disruption of ecological functions such as snow or water catchment, reduction of wind veloc- ity, and nutrient cycling. West and Young2 described in detail the plant communities and management issues in the Great Basin and suggested that development of more effective and economical revegetation techniques should be a research pri- ority, especially for the more arid regions. DOI: 10.2458/azu_rangelands_v34i4_shaw
Document Type: 
Journal Issue/Article
Society for Range Management

Rangelands, a publication of the Society for Range Management, serves as a forum for the presentation and discussion of facts, ideas, and philosophies pertaining to the study, management, and use of rangelands. The journal features scientific and historical articles as well as Society news. It provides readers with scientifically accurate information in a user-friendly format, placed in context of the world we live in today. Rangelands is a practical (non-technical) counterpart of Rangeland Ecology & Management (formerly the Journal of Range Management). The Global Rangelands collection includes articles from Rangelands up to 3 years from the current year. Access to more recent content is available by subscription from BioOne and the Society for Range Management and may also be available at your local university library. 
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