ESTABLISHED ALIEN INVADER TREES AND PROBABLE INVADER TREES IN ARIZONA

Author: 
Brock, John H.
Publisher: 
Society for Range Management
Publication Year: 
2018
Description: 
Four alien trees have established in Arizona wildlands, often in riparian habitats. These trees include: (Ailanthus altissima)�tree-of-heaven, (Elaeagnus angustifolia)�Russian olive, (Tamarix ramosissima)�salt cedar and (Ulmus pumila)�Siberian elm. �Saltcedar�and tree-of-heaven�can be found over most of the state, while�Russian olive and Siberian elm are in cooler landscapes of northern Arizona. Ecological characteristics of these species will be described. These trees invade sites with more soil moisture compared upland areas and especially compete with native riparian vegetation.� In dense stands, the alien trees lower biodiversity, alter stream flow and watershed yield. �Mechanical and/or chemical treatments are used to manage these woody plants. �Biological control using (Diorhabda sp.), a leaf eating beetle, was released for saltcedar�control by the US Department of Agriculture in 2002. The results are interesting. �Six alien trees, mostly confined to urban/residential sites in the Phoenix area are displaying invasive behavior. These species include: (Acacia stenophylla)�shoestring acacia, (A. saligna)�Australian golden wattle, (A. farnesiana)�sweet acacia, (Leucaena leucocephala)�lead tree, (Rhus lancea)�African sumac and (Ulmus parvifolia) Chinese elm.� Some of these species are observed at considerable distances outside of the urban/residential areas, indicating their invasive nature.
Conference Name: 
SRM Reno, NV
Conference Date: 
Wednesday, January 31, 2018
Resource Type: 
Text
Document Type: 
Conference Proceedings
Society for Range Management

A collection of presentation titles and abstracts from the SRM Annual Meeting and Tradeshows